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Totus2us is giving voice to faith, hope and love from all around the world, especially among St John Paul II, Papa Benedict XVI & Pope Francis's 'dearest young people'. Dedicated to Our Lady, Totus2us wants to highlight what's good, true and beautiful, to help us to pray and not be afraid to follow Jesus Christ. There are voices from 125 countries so far on over 40 audio Totus2us podcasts. All free, all with music and available on iTunes, most mp3 episodes are under 10 minutes and fall broadly into 3 areas: prayer (faith / way), Catholic teaching (hope / truth) and witness (love / life).

Some of the feast days this month:
3rd July - St Thomas, the Apostle  4th July - Bl Pier Giorgio Frassati  6th July - St Maria Goretti 
9th July - St Veronica Giuliani  11th July - St Benedict of Norcia   12th July - Louis & Zélie Martin
15th July - St Bonaventure  16th July - Our Lady of Mount Carmel  21st July - St Lawrence of Brindisi 
22nd July - 16th Sunday of Ordinary Time (St Mary Magdalen)  23rd July - St Bridget of Sweden
25th July - St James, the Apostle   31st July - St Ignatius of Loyola, Founder of the Jesuits

Today's something about Mary

is by Christine, from the United States     

"I think Mary is everything, as St John Paul II would say 'Totus Tuus', and we're all hers and she's all ours, for ever. It's a beautiful thing!"

On Sunday 13 October 2013, Pope Francis consecrated the world to the Immaculate Heart of Mary in front of the statue of Our Lady of Fatima in St Peter's Square. In June 1981 (just a month after the assasination attempt on JPII on the Feast of Our Lady of Fatima), it was reported the Blessed Virgin Mary first appeared to 6 children in Medjugorje (in what was then communist Yugoslavia), introducing herself to them as the 'Queen of Peace'. The 6 visionaries say she has been appearing every day since.

Go in Peace      

David, who's 21 & from Ireland: "God will always forgive and there's nothing so great.... the depth of your sins can never equal the depth of God’s mercy and love, and that's one thing I find every time I go to confession. It's almost a safety net there: I know that there's nothing really so bad that I can't talk to God and confess myself."

Enrique, who's 26 & from Madrid, giving his response in English and Spanish "I just find every week when I can go to confession it’s like starting all over again. It doesn’t matter what mistakes one makes, even if it’s the same ones every week, it's the starting over again with a new strength, a new grace."

Hope, the Strength of the Martyrs      

Papa Francisco: "This fidelity to the style of Jesus — which is a style of hope — all the way to death, was to be called a very beautiful name by the first Christians: “martyrdom”, which means “testimony”. There were so many other possibilities offered by the vocabulary: it could have been called heroism, abnegation, self-sacrifice. And instead the early Christians called it a name that is scented with discipleship. The martyrs do not live for themselves, they do not fight so as to assert their own ideas, and they accept to have to die solely through fidelity to the Gospel. Martyrdom is not even the supreme ideal of Christian life, because above it there is charity, that is, the love towards God and towards neighbour. The Apostle Paul says it so well in the hymn to charity: “If I give away all I have and if I deliver my body to be burned, but have not love, it serves me nothing” (1 Cor 13, 3). The idea that suicide bombers can be called “martyrs” is repugnant to Christians: there is nothing in their end that can come close to the attitude of the children of God.

Sometimes, in reading the stories of so many martyrs of yesterday and today — who are more numerous than the martyrs of the first times — we are amazed in front of the strength with which they have faced the test. This strength is sign of the great hope which animated them: the certain hope that nothing and no one could separate them from the love of God given to us in Jesus Christ (cf Rom 8, 38-39).
"

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Catechesis with BXVI - How to Speak of God?      

Catechesis with BXVI: "How to speak of God today? The first response is that we can speak of God, because He has spoken with us. The first condition for speaking of God is therefore to listen to what God himself has said. God has spoken with us! God is thus not a distant hypothesis about the origin of the world; He is not a mathematical intelligence very far away from us. God is interested in us, He loves us, He has entered personally into the reality of our history, He has communicated himself all the way to becoming incarnate. Thus, God is a reality of our lives, He is so great that He also has time for us, He cares for us. In Jesus of Nazareth we encounter the face of God, who came down from his Heaven so as to immerse Himself in the world of men, in our world, and teach the "art of living", the road of happiness; so as to liberate us from sin and render us children of God (cf Eph 1, 5; Rom 8, 14). Jesus came to save us and show us the good life of the Gospel.  .."

St Anthony of Padua (& Lisbon)      

BXVI: "On the one hand the Nativity, a central point of Christ's love for humanity, but equally the vision of the Crucified One inspires in Anthony thoughts of gratitude to God and of esteem for the dignity of the human person, thus that everyone, believers and non-believers, can find in the Crucified One and in his image a meaning that enriches life. St Anthony writes: "Christ, who is your life, is hanging before you, so that you may look in the cross as in a mirror. There you will be able to know how mortal were your wounds, that no medicine could heal except that of the blood of the Son of God. If you look closely, you will be able to realize how great are your human dignity and your worth .... In no other place can man better realise how much he is worth than by looking at himself in the mirror of the cross" (Sermones Dominicales et Festivi III, p 213-214)."

Papa Benedict XVI on his choice of name      

"The name "Benedict" evokes furthermore the extraordinary figure of the great "Patriarch of Western monasticism", St Benedict of Norcia, co-patron of Europe together with saints Cyril and Methodius, and the women saints Bridget of Sweden, Catherine of Siena and Edith Stein. The progressive expansion of the Benedictine Order founded by him had an enormous influence on the spread of Christianity across the whole Continent. St Benedict is thus highly revered also in Germany and particularly in Bavaria, my birthplace; he constitutes a fundamental reference point for the unity of Europe and a strong reminder of the essential Christian roots of its culture and civilization.

We know the recommendation left by this Father of Western Monasticism
in his Rule to the monks: "Absolutely nothing precedes Christ" (Rule 72, 11; cf 4, 21). At the beginning of my service as Successor of Peter, I ask St Benedict to help us hold firm to the centrality of Christ in our existence. May He always be in the first place in our thoughts and in each of our activities! .."

In Memory of Me      

Dorothy, 25 & from England: "When I think of Jesus in the Eucharist I just think of his love for us and the real presence of love. Love is something that we all need, we are made for, we're made in the image of God and we're made in the image of that love that we need. And it is really in the Eucharist that we come face to face with God, that we come into His presence and He loves us, no matter what we've done or who we are, He'll love us and He loves us completely by being truly present there. And becoming so vulnerable to us in the Eucharist, so little and in a way so invisible - we see the bread but it is truly God, it is truly Him. So, yeh, Eucharistic adoration is really a time to come and be love and to love Him. And it's beautiful in the silence as well. There's very little silence in the world nowadays .... and it's in the silence that we have to face ourselves and our brokenness. And it's so beautiful to face that with God in front of you who loves you and to come back to Him."

Incredible Saint Faustina Kowalska       

Patrick, from Germany: "My favourite saint is St Faustina because her intimate relationship with Our Lord has really opened up a lot of things that I did not really know about Our Blessed Lord. Her prayers, or the prayers she received from Jesus Christ, are so powerful and remind us about the message of mercy, which should always be the focus of our faith, and that we can all get close to Our Lord even though we are all sinners, and that we shouldn't despair and always have hope."

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TOP CHAT with Fr Peter Walters      

about his apostolate in Colombia with street-children and the work of the charity Let the Children Live.

"The story really starts back in 1982 when I was a student and I was interested in South America and I saw a cut price deal on an air fare to Colombia and I thought 'Great. I'll go there." And I  went over there on holiday and that was when things started to happen. I got stuck over there because I had a problem with my ticket and I couldn't come back when I wanted to. I could only afford to eat once every two days and one day when I wasn't eating I bumped into a group of children who were begging in the street. Once they realised that I hadn't got any money when they asked me for money and that I was hungrier than they were, they decided to adopt me and they shared their food with me and looked after me. Their kindness, their humanity, moved me enormously. ... For me the encounter with the children was actually a very spiritual thing because I felt that somehow through them God was reaching out to look out for me where I was thousands of miles away from home. I'd got myself into a silly mess, it was all my own fault, and yet I wasn't alone, and yet God was caring for me through these children. And it made me think 'Why wasn't anyone doing anything to help these children?'"

Message for 33rd WYD by Papa Francis      

“Do not be afraid, Mary, for you have found grace close to God”

.. In the moments when doubts and fears flood our hearts, discernment is essential.  It allows us to put order into the confusion of our thoughts and feelings, so as to act in a just and prudent way. In this process, the first thing to do to overcome the fears is to identify them with clarity, so as not to waste time and energy with ghosts that have no face nor consistency.  For this, I invite you to look inside yourselves and to “give a name” to your fears.  Ask yourselves: today, in my concrete situation, what is it that anguishes me, what is it that I fear the most?  What is it that blocks me and impedes me from moving forward?  Why do I not have the courage to make the important decisions that I must make?  Do not be afraid to look with sincerity at your fears, to recognize them with realism and to face them.  The Bible does not deny the human feeling of fear nor its many causes.  Abraham was afraid (cf Gen 12, 10s), Jacob was afraid (cf Gen 31, 31; 32, 7), and so were Moses (cf Ex 2, 14; 17, 4), Peter (cf Mt 26, 69ff) and the Apostles (cf Mk 4, 38-40; Mt 26, 56).  Jesus himself, albeit at an incomparable level, experienced fear and anguish (cf Mt 26, 37; Lk 22, 44).

“Why are you so afraid? Do you still not have faith?” (Mk 4, 40).  This reproach by Jesus to his disciples allows us to understand how the obstacle to faith is often not incredulity, but fear.  Thus, the effort of discernment, once the fears are identified, should help us to overcome them by opening us to life and by facing with serenity the challenges presented to us.  For Christians, concretely, fear should never have the last word, but it gives us the occasion to realize an act of faith in God… and also in life!  This means believing in the fundamental goodness of the existence that God has given us, trusting that He leads us to a good ending even if through circumstances and vicissitudes that are often mysterious to us.  If on the contrary we feed the fear, we will tend to close in on ourselves, to raise a barricade to defend ourselves against everything and everyone, remaining paralyzed.  We must react!  Never close in on ourselves!  In the Sacred Scriptures we find 365 times the expression “do not be afraid”, in all its variations. As if to say that every day of the year the Lord wants us free from fear. ..

Man for Others

Father Greg, from Australia      

"One night I decided I would go and kneel down right in front of the Blessed Sacrament and I simply asked God if He wanted me to be a priest, but without holding anything back for myself for the first time, I just wanted to listen. And at that moment I had a very special experience. It's not for want of saying that Our Lord appeared to me or Our Lady appeared to me in a vision and said I was going to be a priest. It was in some respects even more supernatural because it felt as if for a few moments God focused his attention on me and I'd never felt more loved, never felt more certain about my Catholic faith and, for whatever reason, I'd never felt more certain that God created me to be a priest."

Bishop Elias, from Syria     in French    & in Arabic  

"Il y avait un prêtre qui vivait une vie de sainteté, le curé du village. À l'âge de dix ans, j'ai dit à mes parents 'Je veux devenir prêtre comme ce prêtre.' Et par conséquent, j'ai été au Liban dans le seminaire patriarcal maronite où j'ai été à l'âge de dix ans. Bien sûr j'ai souffert parce que j'étais enfant séparé de sa famille, dans un autre pays, tout ça c'est difficile. J'ai eu beaucoup de maladies après, beaucoup de dépaysements mais ça m'a fait beaucoup, beaucoup de bien, parce que à partir des souffrances on découvre l'amour de Dieu et on découvre réellement le Christ, le Christ. "

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To download the free Totus2us mp3 audio recordings individually, right/double click on the blue play buttons  

All around the world - our universal Catholic faith

You can listen by country to the witness given, by young people in particular, on Totus2us podcasts. Countries represented so far are: Albania, Angola, Antigua & Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Belgium, Benin, Bermuda, Bolivia, Bosnia Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkino Faso, Cameroon, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, China, Colombia, DR Congo, Congo-Brazaville, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech RepublicDominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Finland, France, the Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Gibraltar, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Latvia, Lebanon, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Mozambique, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, the Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Saint Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, Samoa, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad & Tobago, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, UK, USA, Venezuela, Vietnam, Zambia & Zimbabwe.

Countries not included above which Pope Francis, Papa Benedict XVI, St John Paul II &/or Bl Paul VI have visited: Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belize, Botswana, Burundi, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Curaçao, Denmark, East Timor, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Fiji Islands, Gabon, Guam, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iceland, Iran, Jordan, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Morocco, Palestine, Papua-New Guinea, La Réunion, San Marino, Sao Tome & Principe, Solomon Islands, Swaziland, Tunisia & Uruguay.

Our Lady's message to Marija Pavlović
Medjugorje, 25 December 2017

"Dear children! Today I am bringing to you my Son Jesus for Him to give you His peace and blessing. I am calling all of you, little children, to live and witness the graces and the gifts which you have received. Do not be afraid. Pray for the Holy Spirit to give you the strength to be joyful witnesses and people of peace and hope. Thank you for having responded to my call."

“Queridos hijos! Hoy les traigo a mi Hijo Jesús, para que les dé Su paz y Su bendición. Hijitos, los invito a todos a que vivan y testimonien las gracias y los dones que han recibido. ¡No teman! Oren para que el Espíritu Santo les dé la fuerza de ser testigos alegres y personas de paz y de esperanza. Gracias por haber respondido a mi llamado."

"Cari figli! Oggi vi porto mio Figlio Gesù, affinché vi doni la Sua pace e la Sua benedizione. Figlioli, vi invito tutti a vivere e testimoniare le grazie e i doni che avete ricevuto. Non temete! Pregate affinché lo Spirito Santo vi dia la forza di essere testimoni gioiosi e uomini di pace e di speranza. Grazie per aver risposto alla mia chiamata.”

Totus Tuus, Totus2us   

Totus Tuus - Totally Yours - was St John Paul II's motto, having entrusted his life, his priesthood, his all to Mary. Totus2us is being built with the same intention: to be all Mary's. The play on lettering gives Totus2us a 2nd meaning - Everything2us - as that is what Mary means to us.

This mosaic of the Madonna and Christ Child is on the front of the Apostolic Palace in St Peter's Square (near the Pope's window for the Angelus prayer). Beneath it is John Paul II's coat of arms and his motto, Totus Tuus; and beneath this is written MATER ECCLESIAE - Mother of the Church.

It is a tribute John Paul II wanted to make to Mary for her having saved his life in the assassination attempt on 13th May 1981, the Feast of Our Lady of Fatima. Just 6 months later, on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, John Paul II blessed the mosaic, a "sign of the heavenly protection of the Sovereign Pontiff, of the Church and of those who are in St Peter's Square."